Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki: Traveling and Beyond Being under water blurs the self/space boundary because you are always in motion. Michiyuki, the Japanese spatial concept for “moving self,” means traveling from once place to another. It specifically refers to the space you covered and the time you spent while traveling. But by translating Michiyuki to “traveling,” something is […]

Mindfulness through Ma

Mindfulness through Ma

Posted by on Dec 14, 2019 in Blog

More than a gate Another Japanese spatial concept that contributes to designing a mindful space is the boundary in motion. One of the Japanese words for this is Ma, which generally means “gap.” The Chinese character for Ma (間) represents a gate made out of two doors with the moonlight coming through. But Ma is much more […]

Utsuroi in Japanese Architecture and Landscape

Utsuroi in Japanese Architecture and Landscape

Posted by on Dec 14, 2019 in Blog

Utsuroi: changing space Utsuroi, another Japanese spatial concept that causes the self/space boundary to blur, is present throughout Japanese architecture and gardens. Utsuroi means gradual and inevitable change from one state to another. It can also refer to reflection or projection of one thing onto another. Both meanings suggest that nothing is reliable, and everything is […]

Are Online Meetings Noisy?

Are Online Meetings Noisy?

Posted by on Sep 18, 2019 in Architecture, Blog, Space for Well-being

Imagine that you are working in the office trying to make a deadline. But your coworker starts on-line meeting with his computer next to your desk. His voice is loud for the mic to catch it. “Dumb it! He is so noisy!”. You must be irritated with this situation. Noise causes stress. Luckily, to mediate […]

Yugen and the Art of Mysteriousness in Japanese Architecture

Yugen and the Art of Mysteriousness in Japanese Architecture

Posted by on Aug 1, 2019 in Blog

Yugen: appreciating the unknown Japan is a country made up of islands. Surrounded by the ocean, its climate is humid and constantly changing. Along the coast, high mountains are often covered in mist and fog. In part, familiarity with these transforming, obscured landscapes–as seen in this scroll from the Edo period–is what creates the Japanese […]