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Applying Japanese Spatial Concepts to Contemporary Architecture

Applying Japanese Spatial Concepts to Contemporary Architecture

Buildable Philosophies How can you use Japanese spatial concepts in your home? Your garden? Your office? Will doing so make you more mindful? These concepts may seem abstract, but they are buildable concepts. As you can see in the Katsura Imperial Villa and the Itsukushima Shrine, these concepts are not

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The Itsukushima Shrine and the Many Meanings of Hashi

The Itsukushima Shrine and the Many Meanings of Hashi

Hashi in motion A secondary concept of Ma is hashi. Generally, hashi means “edge.” The origin of this pronunciation of hashi comes from the Japanese word hashike, meaning a boat, or a barge. Therefore, saying the word hashi unconsciously carries an image of a boat moving between two borders. In this example,

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Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki: Traveling and Beyond Being under water blurs the self/space boundary because you are always in motion. Michiyuki, the Japanese spatial concept for “moving self,” means traveling from once place to another. It specifically refers to the space you covered and the time you spent while traveling. But by translating

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Penguin Environmental Design
56 Lynmoor Place, Hamden, CT 06517
info@pedarch.com

Blog

Applying Japanese Spatial Concepts to Contemporary Architecture
Applying Japanese Spatial Concepts to Contemporary Architecture

Buildable Philosophies How can you use Japanese spatial concepts in your home? Your garden? Your office? Will doing so make you more mindful? These concepts may seem abstract, but they are buildable concepts. As you can see in the Katsura Imperial Villa and the Itsukushima Shrine, these concepts are not

Read More »
The Itsukushima Shrine and the Many Meanings of Hashi
The Itsukushima Shrine and the Many Meanings of Hashi

Hashi in motion A secondary concept of Ma is hashi. Generally, hashi means “edge.” The origin of this pronunciation of hashi comes from the Japanese word hashike, meaning a boat, or a barge. Therefore, saying the word hashi unconsciously carries an image of a boat moving between two borders. In this example,

Read More »
Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa
Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki: Traveling and Beyond Being under water blurs the self/space boundary because you are always in motion. Michiyuki, the Japanese spatial concept for “moving self,” means traveling from once place to another. It specifically refers to the space you covered and the time you spent while traveling. But by translating

Read More »

Follow us

Contact us

Penguin Environmental Design
56 Lynmoor Place, Hamden, CT 06517
info@pedarch.com