Penguin Environmental Design

Penguin Environmental Design

Penguin Environmental Design

Category: Japanese Garden

“Water in Japanese Gardens” Talk at the Jay Heritage Center

PED’s Takaya Kurimoto gave a talk on “Water in Japanese Gardens” at the Jay Heritage Center for the annual meeting of the Japan Society of Fairfield County (JSFC). Water has been one of the most important elements of Japanese gardens. Even Japanese “dry” gardens have imaginary water. It is the

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The Itsukushima Shrine and the Many Meanings of Hashi

Hashi in motion A secondary concept of Ma is hashi. Generally, hashi means “edge.” The origin of this pronunciation of hashi comes from the Japanese word hashike, meaning a boat, or a barge. Therefore, saying the word hashi unconsciously carries an image of a boat moving between two borders. In this example,

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Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki: Traveling and Beyond Being under water blurs the self/space boundary because you are always in motion. Michiyuki, the Japanese spatial concept for “moving self,” means traveling from once place to another. It specifically refers to the space you covered and the time you spent while traveling. But by translating

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Penguin Environmental Design
56 Lynmoor Place, Hamden, CT 06517
info@penguin.one-globe.com

Category: Japanese Garden

“Water in Japanese Gardens” Talk at the Jay Heritage Center

PED’s Takaya Kurimoto gave a talk on “Water in Japanese Gardens” at the Jay Heritage Center for the annual meeting of the Japan Society of Fairfield County (JSFC). Water has been one of the most important elements of Japanese gardens. Even Japanese “dry” gardens have imaginary water. It is the

Read More »
The Itsukushima Shrine and the Many Meanings of Hashi

Hashi in motion A secondary concept of Ma is hashi. Generally, hashi means “edge.” The origin of this pronunciation of hashi comes from the Japanese word hashike, meaning a boat, or a barge. Therefore, saying the word hashi unconsciously carries an image of a boat moving between two borders. In this example,

Read More »
Michiyuki and the Katsura Imperial Villa

Michiyuki: Traveling and Beyond Being under water blurs the self/space boundary because you are always in motion. Michiyuki, the Japanese spatial concept for “moving self,” means traveling from once place to another. It specifically refers to the space you covered and the time you spent while traveling. But by translating

Read More »

Follow us

Contact us

Penguin Environmental Design
56 Lynmoor Place, Hamden, CT 06517
info@penguin.one-globe.com